Stop Buying for your Fantasy Self

I used to hike many of the 14,000 foot peaks throughout the state of Colorado. It wasn’t uncommon for me to spend every weekend up at altitude. The common question amongst my friends was to ask, “How many 14ers have you hiked?” Racking up the hikes became the goal, and enjoying the outdoors a pastime.

Back then

Once I married and had two kids, I suffered from plantar fascitis and two knee surgeries that quickly curtailed the high impact sports I used to participate in. Recently, I needed a pair of light hiking shoes. I no longer hike 14ers but I do like to hike the moderate foothill trails in and around the county. A pair of trail running shoes would suffice but once I went shopping, the lure of hiking boots and fantasizing about my old way of life became hard to resist. So I bought both. One pair for “light” hiking (included in my budget) and one pair for “heavier” mountaineering (not included in my budget).

Three months later, I had not even used those mountain hiking boots. Oh sure, I had visions of mountaineering again but that fact remains that most of my free time is spent on bleachers somewhere watching my teenagers participate in athletics.

My life now

And when I get the odd day off just for me, I generally want to stick close to home and not wear myself out by hiking up at altitude all day. So I made peace with the fact that I’m not a mountaineer anymore, returned the hiking boots and haven’t looked back since.

Are you buying for your fantasy self? What do you find hard to let go of? Please share below!

3 Replies to “Stop Buying for your Fantasy Self”

    1. Thank you for your comment. I read your post and I think everyone understands this. The fact remains that sometimes we buy duplicates and the new version can change our life for the better (I just did this with a vacuum cleaner). So I think it depends…are you regularly bullet journaling now? Then perhaps the duplicate purchase was a success. You can tear out the used pages of the old journals, then donate the partial journal.
      One trick that has helped me is making a list of all of my stuff and trying to get it below 100 items. Have you read The 100 Thing Challenge? or Colin Wright? Mostly, I hate storing extra of things anymore. The mental space of tracking, storing, feeling guilt about not using it, all becomes too much. My experience is that as I use up stuff, I get better at using up stuff. It’s a skill, I think.
      If people are struggling with duplicates in their wardrobe, Light by Coco has the best method for prioritizing and tracking items that I have ever stumbled across (https://youtu.be/b3Ruo7Lq8qI). I have an all- season, all-year capsule wardrobe and I use this chart to figure out what needs replacing or purchasing. I also think adding structure, like say, “I will get/replace one new piece per season” or something like that helps, too.
      Thank you for sharing and you’ll have to let me know how you like bullet journaling. I’m a big fan of it.

    2. Thank you for your comment. I read your post and I think everyone understands this. The fact remains that sometimes we buy duplicates and the new version can change our life for the better (I just did this with a vacuum cleaner). So I think it depends…are you regularly bullet journaling now? Then perhaps the duplicate purchase was a success. You can tear out the used pages of the old journals and donate the rest.
      One trick that has helped me is making a list of all of my stuff and trying to get it below 100 items. Have you read The 100 Thing Challenge? or Colin Wright? Mostly, I hate storing extra of things anymore. The mental space of tracking, storing, feeling guilt about not using it, all becomes too much. My experience is that as I use up stuff, I get better at using up stuff. It’s a skill, I think.
      If people are struggling with duplicates in their wardrobe, Light by Coco has the best method for prioritizing and tracking items that I have ever stumbled across (https://youtu.be/b3Ruo7Lq8qI). I have an all- season, all-year capsule wardrobe and I use this chart to figure out what needs replacing or purchasing. I also think adding structure, like say, “I will get/replace one new piece per season” or something like that helps, too.
      Thank you for sharing and you’ll have to let me know how you like bullet journaling. I’m a big fan of it.

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